Læsø – part 2

We went to bed quite early the day before, shared the last candy and got wrapped up in our sleeping bags.  We agreed that we probably were to woke up early the day before since  the sun rises early in Scandinavia during summers. However, a hectic period for both of us resulted in that we did not crawl out of our sleeping bags until 10.00 AM. Spending the first waken hour to listen to the woods and the screaking trees Breakfast and morning contemplation Even if the night had been windy along the  coast, and we could hear the wind, we…

Two day hike at Læsø – part 1

The yearly post-exam hike took place at Læsø this year. Læsø is a small island, located 90 minutes with ferry from Fredrikshavn, northern Denmark and is famous for its production of salt, and yeah, probably something more.  We drove from Aalborg in order to catch the 11.30 ferry and parked the car next to the ferry terminal in Fredrikshavn since it should be cheaper to not bring the car with us. However, I somehow managed to pay for four day parking instead of two, so one can wonder if it actually might have been cheaper to park the car at…

Cand.Mag in Tourism Development

Two weeks in Greece and Athens. Amazing weather, amazing city, amazing people. Came back to Aalborg last Monday, and yesterday I graduated after five years at university. Five years, three countries and so many amazing experiences. The Acropolis, Athens At Agistri outside Athens Now I have time, and I have my backpack and my shoes. We will celebrate freedom and infinite opportunities with hiking around Laesoe, just outside Fredrikshavn tomorrow and thursday.  It will probably the last night in my old tent, because I guess that I deserve to get me one of those really ultralight tents now. Well, I…

Roldskov, South of Aalborg: Part 1

As mentioned in the post “ Roldskov (Rold Forest), North Jutland Denmark” I am going to write two or three more post on Roldskov, a recretional area located south of Aalborg, So, this will be the first one. The  route showed above (click for larger picture) is possible to walk it in both directions, both starting and ending at the train station in Skørping. I usually do a lot of detouring, since I have a tendency to not keep to the marked trail. However, the route marked on the map above is following the marked trails, with exception from the…

Roldskov (Rold Forest), North Jutland, Denmark

Roldskov is the second largest forest in Denmark. As much of the other land in Denmark, it is mainly private owned, but some parts are state owned and have been turned into recreational areas. Roldskov offers a quite diverse terrain for being Denmark, and during a whole day in the area you are able to walk through the hills in Rebild (Rebildbakker), the different woodlands, encounter natural springs and enjoy several lakes and hopefully see some wild animals. It is not allowed to camp freely in the area; however there are some places with shelters and areas where you are allowed to…

Recreational Areas within Aalborg: Golfparken (Sohngårdholmsparken on Google Maps)

Golfparken is located close to the university campus and easy accessible by bike or buss and do consist of two parks. The bigger Golfparken, and the smaller Sohngårdholmsparken.In Sohngårdholmsparken (Located close to Humlebakken and Sohngårdholmsvej) you will find the small “castle” Sohngårdholm. Read more here: http://www.visitaalborg.com/ln-int/danmark/sohngaardsholms-park-gdk596171 Sohngårdholm castle in November There are many ways into the park, but I usually walk through the residential area which is located next to the collegium (the name of the road is Bøgesvinget/Golfbakken) on the top of Hadsundvej. Bus number 12 (direction to University) takes you here, and the name of the bus top is…

get you shoes on and get out, Denmark Edition

When I first moved to Denmark I was a bit surprised over how ”inaccessible” the nature were. As you might have noticed, Denmark is more or less synonymous with countryside. It is a relative flat landscape, however, not less diverse and challenging. The biggest challenge would according to me be the that there is very poor information about where to go, and how to get there, even for me who understands and speaks the language. This phenomenon might not be unique to Denmark. I guess that as a “local” you just know where to go, you do not need maps…